I know what I know if you know what I mean

I am a reformed know-it-all.

I used to roll around in knowledge like a warm Dunkin Donut munchkin in powdered sugar. I wanted to be covered in it and then I wanted you to lick me.

Because I knew something. And if I knew it, you should know it, too. Then all our lives would be better.

My knowing has always been a well-intentioned sort.

It didn’t matter what the knowing was: At some points in my life, the knowing was boys. At others, it was Judaism or organized religion. At another junction, it was true love. And at yet another, it was friendship.

I knew what I knew and knowing it made me right. Being right made me feel safe. Not just on-the-surface safe — not the kind of safe we feel when we double-lock our doors or put on seat belts. No, a kind of subconscious, impregnable bubble of well-being that convinced me I knew people and I knew the world and I knew what should be done to make things right or better or good.

Then, something happened. Someone convinced me that there were things I didn’t know. Not only that, someone convinced me there were things I could never know — like what it was like to live during the French Revolution or what it felt like to be in the 2004 tsunami — no matter how much studying I did; no matter how much learning; no matter, even, how much listening. Some things are just unknowable because they are unique experiences. Even if, God forbid, I one day faced a tsunami, it would never be the 2004 tsunami. No matter how many videos on YouTube I watch, I am still an observer.  No matter how many poignant blogs I read, I am still only a participant in my own experience. And so therefore, there is a distinction to be made between what I know and what I know.

Once I knew this — once I knew this — I looked at life very differently. My experience of life and people changed when I understood “I know what I know” and when I accepted “I know there are things I will never know.”

There are things I cannot possibly know no matter how loving, how compassionate, how empathetic, how caring, how interested, how hungry I am. And this matters because it impacts my point of view, it affects how I see the world, people, opportunities, challenges, and risks.

My life changed because I stepped out towards life then as a curious observer; the kind of curious observer we are all born as and remain until life teaches us over and over again to be afraid.

Afraid of being out of control.

Afraid of being in danger.

Afraid of looking stupid.

Afraid of being stupid.

Afraid of being unloved.

Afraid of being unloveable.

You know the list … it’s longer than this.

This isn’t to say I am always acting as the curious observer. Today, for instance, as a man walked out into the street directly in front of my moving car, I thought immediately, “idiot!” But the curious observer now sits in the passenger seat and says, “maybe he had a belly ache and was rushing to the bathroom.” What she doesn’t say, but I know is, “Remember when you did that once?”

The thing is: the frightened know-it-all is constantly whispering from the passenger seat. Remnants of her will float up from deep inside me as ego-scented vibrational waves. Usually this happens when I am on social media or in heated conversations with my husband or my mother. The frightened know-it-all is sensitive to emotions, especially rejection and accusation. She is reactive, especially when under duress. She is only, after all, trying to keep me safe.

But she no longer can hang out there ruling like a queen bee on the playground of my life, one that is indeed filled with mines, but probably less dangerous than I perceive. The curious observer is there, too, asking questions; waiting for answers before stepping out.

 

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10 thoughts on “I know what I know if you know what I mean

  1. Perspective is a wonderful and interesting thing isn’t it? It is also something that comes with time. You’ll get more of it as you get older and then you can feel like a know it all again.

  2. Sooooo good Jen – a reminder for all of us that life is but a plethora of perspective. Don’t you find it removes the footprints of judgement and blame and puts on the shoes of truth and responsibility. Thank you for sharing

    • Jen says:

      Yes. It does in some ways but I also shirk away from truth because i see truth as subjective. I still haven’t found a good substitute for “truth” but I am exploring it

      • That’s very true. I think we will always be exploring as it has so many faces but then I guess that’s what perspective is all about. :-)

  3. This really speaks to me, Jen, especially the second last paragraph. Reacting based on the frightened know-it-all can be easier in those instances because it’s habit, it’s familiar. But embracing the curious observer is so much more rewarding; I often walk away from the experience having learned something, feeling happier, and knowing I haven’t alienated the other people involved. Sounds like you’ve noticed the same. I think, too, that acknowledging that the know-it-all will still pop up shows you are cutting yourself some slack, which is so important.

    • Jen says:

      Yes, sometimes I get down on myself, call myself a fraud, an impostor. But then I take ownership of being a work in progress (still! always a work in progress). This also keeps me in check in my writing.

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